OKLAHOMA SPORTS HALL OF FAME

        LEGACY

     of Oklahoma sports lives here.

Labron Harris

Induction Sponsored by The Oklahoman, KFOR TV, Liberty National Bank, S.W. Medical Center


Steve Largent

Induction Sponsored by The Oklahoman, KFOR TV, Liberty National Bank, S.W. Medical Center

 

Class of 1994 Inductees

Danny Hodge

Induction Sponsored by The Oklahoman, KFOR TV, Liberty National Bank, S.W. Medical Center

 

A native of Perry, Oklahoma, Danny Hodge, won all forty-six of his college matches and thirty-six matches by pin. He also won three straight NCAA championships from 1955-1957.  He placed fifth in the 1952 Helsinki Olympics and returned in 1956 to the Olympic Games in Melbourne, bringing home the silver medal. He was a professional wrestler for 15 years and an amateur boxer, winning the national Gold Glove Boxing championship in 1957. He never lost a bout or a match during his amateur career. In 1959, he began boxing professionally for nine months, winning eight of ten bouts. He was inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame in 1976.

Tulsa native and University of Tulsa standout, Steve Largent, led the nation in touchdown catches in 1974 and 1975 with 14 each year, and was named AP second team All-American in 1975. His college career totals were 126 catches for 2,385 yards and 32 touchdowns. He spent 14 years in the National Football League playing for the Seattle Seahawks. When he retired in 1989, he held all major NFL receiving records, including: career receptions (819), receiving yards (13,089), and touchdown receptions (100). He played in seven Pro Bowls and made the NFL’s All-1980s team. The Seattle Seahawks retired his No. 80 in 1992, and he was later inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1995.

OKLAHOMA SPORTS HALL OF FAME



Ray Soldan

Induction Sponsored by The Oklahoman, KFOR TV, Liberty National Bank, S.W. Medical Center

 

As a junior in 1978 at the University of Oklahoma, Billy Sims led the nation in rushing and scoring with 1,762 yards on 231 carries, and averaged 160.1 yards per game. Sims won the Heisman Trophy in 1978, becoming the sixth junior to ever do so. He was the first player in the Big Eight to rush for more than 200 yards in three straight games, and as a senior, he again led the nation in scoring. Sims was the first overall pick in the 1980 NFL Draft by the Detroit Lions. He gained 1,303 yards and earned NFC Rookie of the Year honors, leading the league with 13 touchdowns. He played five years in Detroit and finished his career with 1,131 carries for 5,106 yards and 186 receptions for 2,072 yards before a knee injury forced his retirement in 1984.

Much of Oklahoma’s sports history could have been lost if not for the early efforts of Ray Soldan. From 1952-1965, he covered high school basketball for the Daily Oklahoman, and from 1965-1975 he covered college sports. He returned to high school athletics in 1975, and continued to cover them until his retirement in 1985. He established the first ever rating system for state high school basketball and track, and picked the All-State teams in basketball for 18 years, football for 11 years and baseball for three years.  He was named Oklahoma Sportswriter of the Year in 1959 by the National Sportscaster/Sportswriter Association, and earned a special recognition award from the Oklahoma Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 1976.

Billy Sims

Induction Sponsored by The Oklahoman, KFOR TV, Liberty National Bank, S.W. Medical Center

 

Labron Harris, Sr., was Oklahoma State University’s golf coach from 1946-1973. In his first year, with mostly walk-ons, his team won the Missouri Valley Conference title by 30 strokes. The following year, OSU won the conference by 103 strokes and took second in the NCAA tournament. In his 27 years at the helm, the OSU golf team won almost 85% of their dual matches, brought home 24 Missouri Valley and Big Eight titles, finished in the top five of the NCAA tournament 19 times and won the national championship in 1963. His teams also produced two NCAA individual champions and 27 All-Americans. Harris also personally won over 150 tournaments, including open championships in Oklahoma, Colorado, Iowa and Wyoming.