Clendon Thomas

Induction Sponsored by The Oklahoman, KFOR TV, Liberty National Bank, S.W. Medical Center

 

Myron Roderick

Induction Sponsored by The Oklahoman, KFOR TV, Liberty National Bank, S.W. Medical Center

 

Alvan Adams

Induction Sponsored by The Oklahoman, KFOR TV, Liberty National Bank, S.W. Medical Center


Clendon Thomas, a standout running back from Oklahoma City, played a key role in the University of Oklahoma’s 1955 and 1956 National Championship teams. Thomas averaged 7.9 yard per carry and led the nation with 18 touchdowns and 108 points in 1956. The 1957 All-American broke the school record for touchdowns and career rushing, averaging just less than seven yards a carry, with 2,120 yards rushing, 115 passing, 292 receiving, 199 in punt returns, 296 in kickoff returns and 36 touchdowns. He was drafted by the Los Angeles Rams in 1958 and traded to the Pittsburgh Steelers in 1962. He played 11 years in the NFL, often on offense and defense. Clendon Thomas was named to the Steelers’ “All Legend Team” in 2007.

OKLAHOMA SPORTS HALL OF FAME

Howard Twilley

Induction Sponsored by The Oklahoman, KFOR TV, Liberty National Bank, S.W. Medical Center

 

A wrestler at Oklahoma State University, Myron Roderick won 42 of 44 matches, three national collegiate championships and placed fourth in the 1956 Olympic Games. At age 23, he was the youngest wrestling coach ever to win an NCAA championship. His teams went on to win nine Big Eight titles and seven NCAA team championships during his 13 years as coach. His Cowboys won 140 dual meets, losing only 10 and tying seven, earning 20 individual NCAA titles and four Olympic gold medals. He coached his teams to two national amateur championships and was picked to coach the U.S. Team in the 1963 World Games. He was named Coach of the Year in 1959, 1962 and 1966, and was inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame in 1976.

Port Robertson

Induction Sponsored by The Oklahoman, KFOR TV, Liberty National Bank, S.W. Medical Center

 

As the head wrestling coach at the University of Oklahoma, Port Robertson produced three NCAA championship teams and three national runners-up, establishing the Sooners as a national power. His wrestlers captured 15 individual NCAA titles and five outstanding wrestler awards. Robertson was named the head coach of the American Olympic team in 1960 and coached the U.S. team to three individual gold medals and placed in five additional weights. His honors also include president of the American Wrestling Coaches and Officials Association in 1958, induction into the Helm's Coaching Hall of Fame in 1960, and the National Wrestling Hall of Fame in 1976.

Class of 1995 Inductees

Howard Twilley shattered school and national records as an offensive end at Tulsa University. He was a consensus All-American, two-time Academic All-American, UPI’s 1965 Lineman of the Year and second in voting for the 1965 Heisman Trophy. He caught 261 college career passes for 3,343 yards and 32 touchdowns and won the 1965 national scoring crown with 127 points on 16 touchdowns and 31 extra points. He was chosen by the Miami Dolphins in the 12th round of the draft and spent the next 11 seasons helping them build championship teams. He had 212 receptions, 3,064 yards and 23 touchdowns and was a member of the 1972 Dolphins team that finished 17-0 and won Super Bowl VII. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1992

The basketball records set by Oklahoma City native, Alvan Adams, at the University of Oklahoma include most points in a game (43), the most rebounds in a game (28), the highest single season scoring average of 26.5 and the highest single rebounding average of 13.3. Before by-passing his senior year for the NBA draft, Adams set additional Sooner records of 1,707 points and 938 rebounds. In his pro-career, he averaged 14.1 points and seven rebounds per game and a .788 percentage from the free throw line in 988 games. He was named NBA “Rookie of the Year” in 1976, and in thirteen pro seasons with the Phoenix Suns, scored a total of 13,910 points. His No. 33 is one of only three to be retired at OU.

        LEGACY

     of Oklahoma sports lives here.

OKLAHOMA SPORTS HALL OF FAME