OKLAHOMA SPORTS HALL OF FAME

        LEGACY

     of Oklahoma sports lives here.

Bob Dellinger carried wrestling to a new level as a sportswriter, tournament planner, scorer, rules interpreter and innovator. He authored two revolutionary rules, the present-day scoring system in 1959, and the current consolation bracketing in 1971. He won the Amateur Wrestling News Award as "Writer of the Year" three straight times from 1960-1962, as a sportswriter for the Daily Oklahoman. He edited the USA Wrestling rule books from 1972-1992, and was elected a Distinguished Member of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame in 1983.

Hubert "Geese" Ausbie

Induction Sponsored by the Harlem Globetrotters


Bennie Owen

Induction Sponsored by


Jerry Rhome

Induction Sponsored by

 

J.W. Mashburn

Induction Sponsored by Stan Harrison

Hubert “Geese” Ausbie was known as "The Clown Prince of Basketball" as a member of the Harlem Globetrotters. Born and raised in Crescent, Oklahoma, Ausbie attended Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Arkansas, from 1956-60. He averaged thirty points per game during his college career. After completing his eligibility, Ausbie opted to try out for the Harlem Globetrotters. He spent the next 24 years charming crowds with his dribbling and scoring skills. During that time, he traveled to over 100 countries on six continents and performed in front of millions fans.

Bob Dellinger carried wrestling to a new level as a sportswriter, tournament planner, scorer, rules interpreter and innovator. He authored two revolutionary rules, the present-day scoring system in 1959, and the current consolation bracketing in 1971. He won the Amateur Wrestling News Award as "Writer of the Year" three straight times from 1960-1962, as a sportswriter for the Daily Oklahoman. He edited the USA Wrestling rule books from 1972-1992, and was elected a Distinguished Member of the National Wrestling Hall of Fame in 1983.

OKLAHOMA SPORTS HALL OF FAME



Arnold Short 

Induction Sponsored by Stan Harrison

Bennie Owen's first season at the University of Oklahoma in 1905 was an omen of greatness to come, ending the season 7-2. Owen coached at OU for 22 years, longer than anyone else in school history. His teams went undefeated four times. His career record would wind up at 122-54-16, a .693 winning percentage, and would outscore opponents by an average of 26.5 to 7.3. He was also OU's Director of Athletics from 1907-1934 and was instrumental in the building of Memorial Stadium and the OU Field House. Owen was voted into the National Football Hall of Fame with its original class of inductees in 1951.

Bill Teegins

Induction Sponsored by the Harlem Globetrotters


J.W. Mashburn became a four-time All-American at Oklahoma State University from 1952-1956, and won the NCAA 400-meter championship in 1955 and 1956. Born in Seminole, Oklahoma, he grew up in Oklahoma City, and was a three-sport letterman at Capitol Hill High School. Considered as one of the nation’s best quarter-milers, he was a member of the U.S. Olympic track team in 1952 and 1956. He won Olympic gold in the 4x400 relay, and won gold again in the 4x400 at the 1955 Pan American Games in Mexico City. 

Class of 2001 Inductees

Bob Dellinger

Induction Sponsored by Amateur Wrestling News, USA Wrestling, and the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Museum

 

Paul Young

Induction Sponsored by Stan Harrison

Jim Weatherall

Induction Sponsored by Amateur Wrestling News, USA Wrestling, and the National Wrestling Hall of Fame and Museum

 

J.W. Mashburn became a four-time All-American at Oklahoma State University from 1952-1956, and won the NCAA 400-meter championship in 1955 and 1956. Born in Seminole, Oklahoma, he grew up in Oklahoma City, and was a three-sport letterman at Capitol Hill High School. Considered as one of the nation’s best quarter-milers, he was a member of the U.S. Olympic track team in 1952 and 1956. He won Olympic gold in the 4x400 relay, and won gold again in the 4x400 at the 1955 Pan American Games in Mexico City. 


Jerry Rhome is one of the most accomplished and prolific passers in the history of college football. Named to almost every All-American team and Collegiate Player of the Year by several polls, Rhome began his collegiate career as quarterback at Southern Methodist University in 1961, leading the Southwestern Conference in passing and total offense. Rhome then transferred for his last two seasons to the University of Tulsa. Rhome signed with the Cowboys. He played on two championship teams with Dallas and participated in the famous "Ice Bowl", against Green Bay in 1967. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1998 and the Texas High School Hall of Fame in 2001.

J.W. Mashburn became a four-time All-American at Oklahoma State University from 1952-1956, and won the NCAA 400-meter championship in 1955 and 1956. Born in Seminole, Oklahoma, he grew up in Oklahoma City, and was a three-sport letterman at Capitol Hill High School. Considered as one of the nation’s best quarter-milers, he was a member of the U.S. Olympic track team in 1952 and 1956. He won Olympic gold in the 4x400 relay, and won gold again in the 4x400 at the 1955 Pan American Games in Mexico City. 

Hubert “Geese” Ausbie was known as "The Clown Prince of Basketball" as a member of the Harlem Globetrotters. Born and raised in Crescent, Oklahoma, Ausbie attended Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Arkansas, from 1956-60. He averaged thirty points per game during his college career. After completing his eligibility, Ausbie opted to try out for the Harlem Globetrotters. He spent the next 24 years charming crowds with his dribbling and scoring skills. During that time, he traveled to over 100 countries on six continents and performed in front of millions fans.