OKLAHOMA SPORTS HALL OF FAME

        LEGACY

     of Oklahoma sports lives here.

Bob Stoops was a four-year starter for the University of Iowa’s football team. He was an All-Big Ten selection and named Iowa’s team MVP in 1982.  After graduating Stoops began his coaching career as a graduate assistant for the Iowa Hawkeyes. He was an assistant at Kent State University, and joined the coaching staff at Kansas State University under Bill Snyder. Following his tenure at Kansas State, Stoops went to the University of Florida to serve as defensive coordinator under Steve Spurrier. and was a major part of the Gator’s 1997 National Championship run.

The University of Oklahoma named Bob Stoops its 21st head coach in 1999. In his 18 years as head coach of the Sooners, Stoops compiled a .798 winning percentage, led OU to its seventh national title in 2000, won 10 Big 12 conference championships and appeared in 18 straight bowl games. Coach Stoops was a two-time Walter Camp Coach of the Year recipient, and AP coach of the year in 2000, Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year, 2003, Home Depot Coach of the Year, 2000 and was awarded the Paul “Bear” Bryant Award in 2000. He was also named the Big 12 Coach of the Year six times. Stoops teams finished ranked in the top 10, 11 of his 18 seasons in Norman. Bob Stoops retired from OU on June 7, 2017. He was named Head Coach and General Manager of the Dallas franchise of the professional football league, XFL, on February 7, 2019.

Class of 2019 Inductees

Kendall Cross

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Patricia Marie Gasso (Froehlich) began her coaching career at Long Beach City College, where she compiled a 161-59-1 record from 1990-1994. The University of Oklahoma hired Coach Gasso in 1995. She has compiled a 1,203-327-2 record during her 24 years at OU and has molded the Sooners softball program into a national power. Oklahoma has won four national championships, 2000, 2013, 2016 and 2017. Gasso’s teams have reached the Women's College World Series 12 times and advanced to the postseason in each of her 24 seasons as head coach. The Sooners have claimed 11 Big 12 regular season titles under her direction. Gasso's teams have finished second or higher 19 different times in the 23 years of the Big 12. Gasso has a career collegiate coaching record of 1,364-386-3 in 28 seasons as a head coach. Her accomplishments during her tenure at Long Beach City College and at OU led to her being inducted into the National Fastpitch Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 2012.

Patty Gasso

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Will Shields attended Lawton High School where he played football for the Lawton Wolverines. He led the Wolverines to the 1987 State Championship. After graduating high school, Will attended the University of Nebraska. He was a consensus first team All-American and won the 1992 Outland Trophy. Following college, he was drafted in the third round of the 1993 NFL draft by the Kansas City Chiefs. Will made his first Pro Bowl in 1995, which led to 12 straight Pro Bowl selections. He was named first-team All-Pro in 1999, 2002, and 2003 and picked as a second-team All-Pro four times. Shields was named All-AFC seven times including in each of his final six seasons. He is a member of the NFL’s All-Decade Team of the 2000s.  He never missed a single game over his 14-year NFL career and set a Chiefs franchise record playing in 224 consecutive games. The Chiefs won four division titles and made six playoff appearances during his career. Will Shields was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2011, the Kansas City Chiefs Hall of Fame in 2012, and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2015.                                          

Will Shields

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Mike Moore

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Mickey Tettleton

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Mickey Tettleton grew up in Oklahoma City and attended Oklahoma State University. He helped guide OSU to the finals of the 1981 College World Series and was selected to the all-tournament team. He was drafted by the Oakland Athletics in the fifth round of the 1981 Major League Baseball Amateur Draft. Tettleton made his major league debut on June 30, 1984. He spent three years with the Athletics. He then signed with the Baltimore Orioles. He was chosen to the 1989 American League All-Star team. He also received the Silver Slugger Award as the top offensive catcher in the American League. Mickey was traded to the Detroit Tigers. Tettleton set career highs in nearly every offensive category during the 1991 season in Detroit. He followed up in 1992 with a career-best 32 home runs and ranked first in the American League with a .966 fielding percentage as a catcher.  Tettleton led the Tigers in 1993 with 32 home runs and was second on the team with 110 RBIs. He signed with the Texas Rangers in 1995 and played mostly right field and designated hitter. Injuries force him to retire from baseball during the 1997 season. At the time of his retirement, he ranked eighth in major league history in career home runs by a switch-hitter. Tettleton's .369 on-base percentage ranks him 10th highest all-time among major league catchers.

Lou Henson

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Bob Stoops

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Mike Moore grew up in Eakly, Oklahoma, and became a baseball phenom. Moore played college baseball at Oral Roberts University from 1979 to 1981. He was an All-American in 1981 and is ORU's all-time leader in complete games. The Seattle Mariners drafted him with the first pick overall in the 1981 MLB amateur draft. Moore made his major league debut on April 11, 1982. He played six seasons in Seattle. Moore was a member of the Oakland A's team that swept the San Francisco Giants in the 1989 World Series, starting and winning two of the four games. He was also on the A's 1990 World Series team. Moore was elected to the American League All-Star team in 1989 where he struck out Tony Gwynn and finished third in the Cy Young Award voting. Following the 1992 season, Mike played for two years with the Detroit Tigers. He finished his career with a regular season record of 161-176 with a 4.39 earned run average, 79 complete games, and 16 shutouts in 450 games pitched. Moore compiled a 3-2 won-loss record with a 3.29 earned run average in 5 postseason series.                                                      

Kendall Cross won the 1985 state wrestling title while at Mustang High School in Mustang, Oklahoma. Cross then attended Oklahoma State University where he was a three-time All-American wrestler and won the 1989 NCAA Championship. Cross was a three-time U.S. National Champion and named outstanding freestyle wrestler at the U.S. Nationals in both 1992 and 1995.  Kendall was a bronze medalist at the 1986 Junior World Championships. He qualified for the 1992 and 1996 U.S. Olympic Teams. Kendall took home the Gold Medal in the 57-kilogram (125.5 pounds) weight class at the 1996 Games. Cross then won the 1997 World Cup Championship. He served as an assistant coach at the University of North Carolina and coached for the Dave Schultz Wrestling Clubs and Sunkist Kids. He went on to serve as assistant coach at Harvard University. He founded Kendal Cross Gold Medal Wrestling Club in Boston and helped coach at Dallas Dynamite and at Trinity Christian Academy in Dallas. He currently serves as Director of Kendall Cross Wrestling Camps and as a head coach at the New York City Regional Training Center. 

Louis Ray Henson was born and raised in Okay, Oklahoma. Henson began his basketball coaching career in 1956 at Las Cruces High School. He led Las Cruces to three state championships and began his college coaching career in 1962 at Hardin-Simmons University in Abilene, Texas. Henson compiled a 67-36 record at Hardin-Simmons. He then took the head coaching job at New Mexico State in 1966. He led the Aggies to the Final Four in 1970. Henson coached at New Mexico State for nine seasons, with six trips to the NCAA Tournament. Henson moved to the University of Illinois in 1975. He compiled a .654 winning percentage at Illinois and took the Illini to the 1989 Final Four. Henson spent 21 seasons at Illinois and is the all-time leader in wins with 423.Lou returned to New Mexico State in 1997 and led the Aggies to the 1999 Big West regular season and tournament titles. Henson became the NMSU’s all-time winningest basketball coach. Lou Henson retired from coaching during the 2004-2005 season. He compiled a career record of 779-412 over 41 seasons and was inducted into the College Basketball Hall of Fame in 2015.

OKLAHOMA SPORTS HALL OF FAME